What Readers are Saying about “The Year of the Mite”

Below are some recent reviews. And as I post this, Amazon seems to be offering the eBook free!

And, by the way, if you have read the book, please post a review… the more reviews, the more likely the Amazon genii is to offer the book to folks searching for information about mites. Thanks!

“Jane certainly has a gift for writing, her story is both captivating and fascinating but she also provides valuable knowledge on what she did to rid herself and her family of the problem. I laughed and was angry with her as I read her story and I’m sure others that have been through this can relate. The few friends that believe be me know I’m suffering but they’ll never quite understand because unlike any other bug infestation a mite is so small you typically can’t see it and what’s even worse is these mites are extremely resilient so when you get to the point that you think you are getting them under control or their almost gone and then they come back with a vengeance it makes you want to give up. I’m so glad I found this book, I only wish I found it sooner. If you are going through a bird mite infestation or know anyone going through one please, please, please tell them about this book it will help them more than you know! And last to Jane Ishka thank you, you are a godsend!” 
–S.E.

“Shining a light on such a little know and often misunderstood topic. No one can possibly comprehend how this tiny invader can ruin relationships, lives and drive you to the brink of insanity only to be told by health professionals that you are delusional. Great read, thank you Jane.”
-Just Me

“This is an important book about the under-recognized problem of mite infestation. Last September, something we couldn’t see started biting us in our home, and we thought it was mosquitos until the weather turned cold. Then, after researching online, we realized that we probably had microscopic mites left over from an earlier mouse infestation. Before this experience, we had no idea that a few species of animal mites sometimes attack humans.

As the book explains, mites can be difficult to catch, and the bites affect some people worse than others. Many individuals may be unaware of an infestation because the bites don’t bother them. For people who are sensitive to the bites, however, an infestation can be an ordeal, as Ishka attests. Because the effects of the bites may mimic other physical and emotional conditions, sufferers are often misdiagnosed; so the problem may be more common than many doctors and even entomologists realize. We need more public awareness about mite infestations to stimulate research for better diagnostic techniques and miticides than are currently available.

Many thanks to Ms. Ishka for her intelligent narrative, dry humor, and wise coping strategies. She has inspired me to do a lot of work around the house to make the place less hospitable to mites.”
–djchabot

“I cried when I read this book. I’ve been battling bird or rodent mites for 5 years, and I feel so alone. I am an educated person–I have a Bachelor’s in Biology, but I have never felt so defeated as I have by these mites. I’ve tried everything under the sun, spent tens of thousands of dollars, but it is never enough. I’m so glad Jane Ishka wrote this book—not just because I relate to her experience, but because she is calling for the medical and scientific community to step up. We need publicity and research. We need help. If you are suffering from mites, this is the book to read.”
– Infested

“Very helpful, comforting and intelligently written. Finally some protocol information that makes sense as well as current scientific information. A mite infestation can completely derail your life and any plans you might have had for it. It is very easy to feel alone and unheard. I am thankful that Jane Ishka has spoken out for those with no voice. I hope that the CDC, the medical community and the pest control industry read this book so that progress can be made and we can get our lives back.”
-Amazon Customer

“Finally an authoritative- and absorbing- book on the horrendous phenomenon of bird mites. Jane Ishka also has a website. Her clear protocol, sense of humor, and ultimate health all give hope to those of us dealing with this. I can’t say enough about my gratitude to her for writing this book”.
– PW

“Housebakers” — An Excerpt from the book, The Year of the Mite

Kenny from Housebakers called me. “We cooked the house for ten hours, just to be sure,” he said.  They were packing up.  It was time to go home.

When I got home from work, Monica was making dinner. She had the fan part of the heating system running to cool off the house — the fan that blew air through the untreated heating ducts.

The house was hot.  So hot that you walked through neighborhoods of heat, touched furniture and it throbbed against your hand, stepped on the Spanish tile that was usually cool and it almost burned your heels.

The pumpkin left on the table from Halloween was melted on top.  The computer wireless was knocked out.  The glycerin soap by the bathroom sink looked like it always did, but when you reached for it, your fingers went right through.  The milk had soured in the refrigerator. But there were prickly sensations, almost bites or maybe bites.  Monica feared she was being bitten, hoped that her skin was just hyperreactive from all the scrubbing to get the bugs out of our pores.

They had brought the house to 60 degrees Centigrade, and pumped in hot air, hour after hour.  The ceiling paneling warped, a plastic cup left a red melted ring on a counter, the bananas turned solid black, and the bugs were still biting.

I lay down briefly on the bed. The surface had cooled but I could sense the hot core like the middle of the earth. When I rested the side of my face on the pillow, they climbed into my ear.  It was like I was a book they had been reading, and they remembered just where they left off.

“I can’t get out plates for dinner,” said Sophie, “they’re too hot.”

It was hot enough to wake the dead, like the poem about the gold miner Sam McGee in the Alaskan crematorium:

Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee, it’s the first time I’ve been warm.

Every bug in the house woke up and said thanks.

It was time to run away.